Killer Interview Questions and Their Answers

  1. Give me an overview of your experience.

Summarize your skills and experience here and try to ensure it moves from historical experience through to the present day. Ensure that it relates to the new role.

If you have no work history, then look at your training and college or university course and find examples of where you did similar work.

  1. If I asked your friends/colleagues about you what would they say?

This one is a classic. There is no straight answer to this, but you need to have it prepared. Remember to have a positive weakness, as it sounds more realistic.

  1. Why are you leaving your Job?

The answer to this must be positive. If you have been there a while, it’s easy to understand how people move on. If you were made redundant, ensure that you mention that a whole department or team was made redundant.  If it was just you, then it might raise a red flag.

If you were sacked, then you really don’t want to mention this. It’s best to say “The organization wasn’t for me and we decided it was best to move on”.

  1. Are you looking elsewhere?

This can also be worded as “Are you looking at any other jobs”, or “Have you had any interviews”?

This is usually a test.

1) If you have had many interviews and no offers, it might raise question marks.

2) If you have had a couple of interviews and are expecting an offer this week or next, then it will accelerate their decision making.

So always offer the last answer!

Never say “I have been looking for ages, have applied to lots of jobs, had lots of interviews, but no offers!  – It immediately raises a red flag.

  1. What is your ideal job?

Never say “this one” – it shows you are false. Instead go for aspects of any job that you like. For example “I would like to work in an environment where I love the work, have great people that I can learn from” or “I would like to work for a company that invests in its people. I’m not scared of pressure – it helps motivate people”.

  1. What questions do you have?

Always have your list of questions prepared. Never leave without asking something. It can be about a recent business win, or how they would describe the work environment. Don’t forget – this is not the time to ask about the money or the package!

  1. What salary do you want?

A trick question, this one. First of all, if you are going through a recruitment agent or a recruiter, then let them handle this.  Simply say “My recruiter told me not to talk about salary, I’m sure it would be a fair”. If you are not going through a recruiter, then ask what range of salary the position is offering. This is tactical. You need to know the range, as you want to be at the higher limit. Then you suggest somewhere around the higher limit. Do not undersell yourself which is easier said than done. Imagine you are there in the room, you like the job so much that you could easily accept less than you were expecting. But I tell you now, when you are working there for a couple of months you will regret not pushing you salary request higher.

No matter what salary you say, the offer will be lower. So say around the higher figure, and you will get a decent offer.